Telrad Red Dot Finder Video Review

Telrad Red Dot Finder Video Review


The video below is an unboxing of the Telrad red dot finder. This fantastic reflex sight finder received the group test winner award in the Sky at Night magazine. 

The Telrad comes with a base plate fitted with double sided tape to attach the finder to just about any scope without the need to drill holes in your precious telescope. You can even purchase additional baseplates so that your Telrad can be swapped between different telescopes. Although, you would need to realign the Telrad each time. Luckily, this is pretty easy to do by simply adjusting the three dials on the Telrad. One to move the reflex sight upwards, one down and left and one down and right. 

This red dot finder doesn't have a red dot like other reflex finders it has three rings instead. The outermost ring covers 4 degrees of the night sky. This is about equivalent to a finderscope. So, you could put your object of interest in the large circle and then zoom in using your finderscope. The innermost circle is half a degree and this is roughly the area your telescope might show you. You can use this circle if you prefer to not use a finderscope at all and just rely on the Telrad to find your objects of interest. The middle circle is 2 degrees and really helps with locating an object in the night sky. 


The finderscope requires two AA batteries, these will last you a fairly long time.


If you struggle to use a finderscope with it's upside down images and the mind gymnastics required to keep picturing your object in different orientations between the finderscope and the telescope and the sky maps then a red dot finder can be really useful. Because the red dot  finder has the same orientation as your own eyes and the sky map, it is much easier to point it at the part of the night sky you want to view. With this set-up you only need to orientate yourself once and that is when you are looking down your telescope.


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